Utilizing Verbal Abilities to Relate to Others

Jason demonstrated several verbal or language-related skills that contribute to relating to his peers. These included the use of humor, precise interpretations and use of language specific to his peer group, and communication of emotions. Utilizing language-related skills to relate to others is referred to as verbal pragmatic abilities.

Students who develop and use their verbal pragmatic abilities are adept at interpreting and expressing feelings, matching the moods and emotions of their peers, modifying language depending upon the audience, and monitoring and repairing verbal interactions.

To learn more about the various aspects of verbal pragmatics, or the ways in which language abilities help a child make and keep friends, click on one of the topics below.

Necessary SubSkillsCommon ObstaclesHelpful Tips
Student accurately communicates his/her feelings or emotions through the appropriate selection of words and use of intonation. Student is not able to communicate his/her feelings accurately, e.g. does not use accurate words or appropriate intonation. view
Student is able to interpret the language used by others, thus understanding others' feelings. Student does not comprehend other persons' feelings, e.g. is not able to accurately interpret the language used by others. view
Student is able to match his/her statements to the emotions of a friend or group of friends during an interaction. Student is not able to match his/her statements with the feelings of a friend or group of friends during a conversation. view
Student is able to choose appropriate words, phrases, and intonation to use depending on the audience and social situation. Student is not able to choose appropriate language, etc. for a given situation, and instead uses the same language regardless of the audience. view
Student is able to select and maintain an appropriate topic during conversation. Student selects poor topics for conversation or converses about a topic for too short or too long a period of time. view
Student is able to produce humor effectively, and understands if his/her remarks are having the desired impact. Student is not able to effectively produce humor, or is unable to monitor the effects of his/her remarks on others. view
Student is able to make requests in an appropriate way, increasing the likelihood that the listener will fulfill the speaker's needs. Student does not make requests in an appropriate manner, decreasing the likelihood that the listener will fulfill the speaker's needs. view
Student is able to use the language of his/her peer group with authenticity. Student does not appear credible or authentic when using the language of his/her peer group. view
Student is able to self-monitor what he/she says, determining if his statements are meeting his/her desired goals and repairing his/her language/statements if necessary. Student does not appear to self-monitor what he/she says, e.g. does not repair mistakes in language or statements in social interactions. view
Student is able to provide appropriate criticism of others and interpret criticism from others effectively. Student is not able to communicate criticism appropriately, or is unable to interpret criticism from others effectively. view