Utilizing Non-Verbal Abilities to Relate Others

Jason knows that his clothes, shoes, hairstyle, and the way he carries himself say a lot about him. In fact, Jason's behavior illustrates how an individual's non-verbal abilities in social interactions are at least as important as the words and statements he/she uses (verbal pragmatics). For instance, when Jason and his friends meet at the bus stop, they use non-language abilities to start and maintain their social interaction. These non-verbal skills, when combined with verbal pragmatic skills, strongly affect a student's ability to relate to others, and to start and maintain friendships. To learn more about the non-verbal skills that contribute to social cognition, click on one of the topics below.

Necessary SubSkillsCommon ObstaclesHelpful Tips
Student is able to greet others, to successfully start a conversation or enter a group interaction. Student is unable to greet others, e.g., to start a conversation or enter a group interaction successfully. view
Student is effective at the give and take of friendships and relationships. Student is unable to share or engage in give and take with friends and others. view
Student is able to reinforce others, to make them feel good about themselves. Student is able to reinforce others, to make them feel good about themselves. view
Student is able to take the perspective of another, to see how other people are feeling or thinking. Student is unable to take the perspective of another, or to understand how they are feeling or thinking. view
Student is able to initiate friendships or interactions in an indirect manner. Student is unable to initiate interactions in an indirect manner. view
Student uses body language and movement to communicate positive and compatible feelings. Student is not adept at using non-verbal cues, e.g., is unaware that his/her body language communicates negative messages to others. view
Student is able to maintain a balanced level of control in a social interaction or relationship, e.g., is neither too passive nor too aggressive. Student is either too passive, or too domineering within social interactions or relationships. view
Student is able to resolve problems or conflicts without resorting to aggression. Student resorts to aggression when problems or conflicts arise with others. view
Student is able to pace the sequence of events related to the development of a friendship. Student moves too slowly or quickly when establishing relationships with others. view
Student monitors and understands the feedback he/she gets from others during interactions. Student does not monitor the reactions he/she gets or the feedback he receives from others during social interactions. view
Student is able to communicate a socially acceptable image to others. Student projects an unacceptable image to others. view
Student uses strategies for recuperation when he/she experiences a social setback or failure. Student has no strategies to repair social mistakes, or is unable to recuperate from social failures. view